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How To File for Workers Compensation

Published / by Stephenson

A significant number of employees suffer permanent or long-term injuries at the workplace. Such injuries limit their ability to earn a living as it was before. Luckily, such individuals can file for permanent disability benefits that can help cushion them against financial losses resulting from staying out of their jobs for considerable time. Workers’ compensation typically covers the injured employees’ medical bills and other expenses.

Who is Eligible for Compensation?

In this case, eligibility is typically determined by the report that a workers’ compensation doctor will file. In the course of your treatment, the medic will ascertain whether your condition can allow you to go back or not. Once you reach a maximum medical improvement point, the medical practitioner will undertake an examination to establish whether the injuries that you suffer have left you with permanent limitations that may prevent you from resuming your job. Thereafter, you will be assigned a disability rating. This is an index representing the extent of the permanent limitation that you have suffered.

Sometimes, the doctor may opt to give a whole-person impairment rating. This is normally the case in instances where the injury involves your neck, internal organs, head, and back. If you are a mine worker for instance and you end up suffering a lung critical lung disease, you are eligible to receive a whole person impairment rating of up to 40%.

Calculating Disability Benefits and How Personal Injury Lawyers Help

Typically, calculating permanent and long-term disability benefits involves a lot of intricacies. This varies according to the state that you are in because each states employs a different method when determining how much disability benefits is to be paid to injured workers. The main determinant of how much you will receive is the extent to which you were injured. This implies either partial or total disability.

picture of a man hurt at work

Permanent total disability is that which prevents you from ever getting involved in meaningful employment in your life. Those who are deemed to have sustained permanently and totally disabled are those with debilitating and serious injuries such as the loss of limbs, or eyesight. If you suffer this kind of disability, you will receive payments for the rest of your life. On the other hand, permanent partial disability implies scheduled and unscheduled disabilities, which are not as dangerous as permanent total disabilities.

If you are injured at your place of work, it is advisable that you get in touch with a disability lawyer who will help you understand all the workers’ compensation rules that relate to your case. Besides this, he/she will represent you in court when or when negotiating for a higher compensation. You definitely need a lawyer who will handle the case on your behalf while you focus on your treatment and recovery. Since lawyers have a better understanding of workers’ compensation laws, you stand a better chance of getting slightly more compensation by hiring one.

The Legality of Marijuana in the United States

Published / by Stephenson

legal books on a table

The legality of marijuana in the United States has been under fierce debate for decades. Countless political and cultural movements have made efforts to either legalize or criminalize marijuana, and its status as a schedule I controlled substance has impacted the nation for decades. How did Marijuana become classified in the way it is today, and what is the likely future of the drug?

In 1970, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released a list of drug schedules which categorized drugs into separate categories. Schedule I drugs are considered the most harmful of them all, and constitute drugs with high risk and no counterbalancing benefits; Marijuana is categorized as a schedule I drug.

While marijuana’s classification as a schedule I drug has endured fiery debate from the start, the enforcement of statutes outlawing and punishing its use has a mixed history. In recent years, particularly under former President Barack Obama, the federal government has largely stepped back from policing marijuana, instead opting to allow states to decide for themselves how to implement marijuana laws.

Individual states gradually began to decriminalize marijuana as early as the 1970’s, though medicinal cannabis wasn’t legalized until 1996. The states of Colorado and Washington famously legalized marijuana for recreational use for the first time in U.S. history in 2012, unleashing an avalanche of legal change across the nation.

Currently, recreational usage of marijuana is legal in eight states and the District of Columbia. Medicinal marijuana is currently legal in 12 states, and most states have some form of marijuana legalized or decriminalized, with the exception of Kansas, Idaho and South Dakota.

Many states have pending legal or political initiatives to either decriminalize, fully legalize, or medically legalize marijuana. Public support for marijuana’s legalization has grown rapidly in recent decades, with a majority of Americans now supporting it.

The classification of marijuana as a schedule I drug has had a significant impact on U.S. history; millions of arrests have taken place for the possession, distribution, and use of marijuana over the past few decades. Social and legal activist have claimed that marijuana laws often fall along distinctly racial lines, and unfairly lead to greater incarceration rates among minorities.

The full legalization of medicinal and recreational marijuana appears to be continuously gaining support in the United States, though current Attorney General Jeff Sessions, head of the U.S. Justice Department, has signaled his intention to resist legalization efforts. Nonetheless, despite its broad support among the American public, the legalization of marijuana was not a particularly large issue in the 2016 presidential election.
What are your thoughts on the legalization of marijuana? How has it affected you? Leave a comment below!

Gun Alternatives for Police Officers

Published / by Stephenson

I can only imagine what it is like to be a police officer today. The world we leave in is a dangerous place. Although I feel that racial profiling does, unfortunately, ignite a lot of fear in police officers, their overall fear on the job is not completely unwarranted.

I try to imagine stopping a random stranger on the side of the road and approaching his or her car. I try to imagine going to a stranger’s home to investigate a domestic dispute call and not knowing how violent the aggressor is. That is certainly not a job that I could personally take on, and I commend police officers for taking on that role.

With the fear of the unknown, I understand the need for protection. I certainly would not roam the city without a sufficient method of protection. That being said, I often wonder why guns are the primary method of choice. I also wonder why there are not more alternative uses of protection available. I know that there are Tasers, and I think that they are an excellent alternative to guns. However, I do not understand why they are not used more. I read an article written by a retired cop who said that guns are used more often, because you may only have one option of defense if the aggressor comes at you with deadly force. The article also explained that for Tasers, there needs to be contact of the skin with both electrodes. If that contact does not happen, the Taser will be ineffective.

After reading that article, I can understand why guns are used more often. I just don’t understand why we have not improved the Taser or worked on creating another alternative. Guns are extremely deadly, yet very easy to use. A lot of police officers are not in danger of “deadly force” when they are dealing with citizens. They panic, and they immediately grab their guns, because they know that that will stop the problem. But at the end of the day, it does not stop the problem, and a lot of innocent people are killed.

I am not the one creating these weapons, so I cannot speak on how easy it is to create a new weapon that will be effective while also protecting police officers. However, I do know that we spend a lot of money and time arresting and incarcerating people for marijuana charges, but we cannot seem to spend the time and money on finding an alternative to guns for police officers. Police officers are not the only ones who need to protected, citizens do too. A misunderstanding should not lead to a gunshot wound to the chest. I think that we have enough intelligent individuals who can come up with a non-deadly form of protection for police officers, that it is more effective than the Taser.